Know your Wheels

Number of Bicyclists killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2016

The highest fatality rate per million population occurred in Florida in 2016

%

Increase in people bicycling to work from 2000 to 2012

Helmets

Size can vary between manufacturers. Follow the steps to fit a helmet properly. It may take time to ensure a proper helmet fit, but your life is worth it. It’s usually easier to look in the mirror or have someone else adjust the straps. For the most comprehensive list of helmet sizes according to manufacturers, go the Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute (BHSI) Web site at www.bhsi.org.

Avoid Crashes

DRIVE DEFENSIVELY – FOCUSED AND ALERT

Be focused and alert to the road and all traffic around you; anticipate what others may do, before they do it. This is defensive driving—the quicker you notice a potential conflict, the quicker you can act to avoid a potential crash:

  • Drive with the flow, in the same direction as traffic.
  • Obey street signs, signals, and road markings, just like a car.
  • Assume the other person doesn’t see you; look ahead for hazards or situations to avoid that may cause you to fall, like toys, pebbles, potholes, grates, train tracks.
  • No texting, listening to music or using anything that distracts you by taking your eyes and ears or your mind off the road and traffic.

 

DRIVE PREDICTABLY

Drive where you are expected to be seen, travel in the same direction as traffic and signal and look over your shoulder before changing lane position or turning

Avoid or minimize sidewalk riding. Cars don’t expect to see moving traffic on a sidewalk and don’t look for you when backing out of a driveway or turning. Sidewalks sometimes end unexpectedly, forcing the bicyclist into a road when a car isn’t expecting to look for a bicyclist. If you must ride on the sidewalk remember to:

  1. Check your law to make sure sidewalk riding is legal;
  2. Watch for pedestrians;
  3. Pass pedestrians with care by first announcing “on your left” or “passing on your left” or use a bell;
  4. Ride in the same direction as traffic. This way, if the sidewalk ends, you are already riding with the flow of traffic. If crossing a street, motorists will look left, right, left for traffic. When you are to the driver’s left, the driver is more likely to see you;
  5. Slow and look for traffic (left-right-left and behind) when crossing a street from a sidewalk; be prepared to stop and follow the pedestrian signals; and
  6. Slow down and look for cars backing out of driveways or turning.

IMPROVE YOUR RIDING SKILLS

No one learns to drive a vehicle safely without practice and experience; safely riding your bike in traffic requires the same preparation. Start by riding your bike in a safe environment away from traffic (a park, path, or empty parking lot).

Take an on-bike class through your school, recreation department, local bike shop or bike advocacy group. Confidence in traffic comes with learning how to navigate and communicate with other drivers, bicyclists, and pedestrians. Review and practice as a safe pedestrian or bicyclist is great preparation for safe riding.

Drivers: Share the Road

People on bicycles have the same rights as people behind the wheel. And the same responsibilities.

  • Yield to bicyclists as you would motorists and do not underestimate their speed. This will help avoid turning in front of a bicyclist traveling on the road or sidewalk, often at an intersection or driveway.
  • In parking lots, at stop signs, when packing up, or when parking, search your surroundings for other vehicles, including bicycles.
  • Drivers turning right on red should look to the right and behind to avoid hitting a bicyclist approaching from the right rear. Stop completely and look left-right-left and behind before turning right on red.
  • Obey the speed limit, reduce speed for road conditions and drive defensively to avoid a crash with a cyclist.
  • Give cyclists room. Do not pass too closely. Pass bicyclists as you would any other vehicle—when it’s safe to move over into an adjacent lane.
These statistics and tips that appear on this page were taken from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), more information can be found here https://www.nhtsa.gov/road-safety/bicycle-safety